Exotic Animals

Cats and dogs are amazing pets to have, but you may be considering something a little more...exotic. Exotic pets may not be as popular as other animals that you are used to seeing as part of a family’s household, but they can be just as fun, rewarding, and easy to form bonds with! 

Birds, for example, are highly intelligent animals that can be taught to or vocalize. Turtles, if provided the proper habitat and dietary requirements, can be another great addition to your home with their unique personalities. Reptiles are quiet, low-maintenance, scaly friends that can also offer you companionship without all the hassle. Read more below to discover what type of care each of these animals needs and if they’re right for you.

  • Canaries

    The Canary species is called Serinus canaria and is actually a member of the finch family, native to the Canary Islands. The wild canary is greenish yellow over most of their body with yellow underparts. The domestic canary comes in an array of bright colors and can live up to 10 years. Male canaries

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  • Lovebirds

    Lovebirds are very social and form deep bonds with their owners. If you are short on time to spend with your lovebird, then it is best to get him or her a companion. There are several species of lovebirds, such as the genus Agapornis. But the most commonly found species in the pet trade include peach

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  • African Grey Parrots

    There are two subspecies of African grey parrot commonly found in the pet trade - the Congo African grey (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) and the Timneh African grey (Psittacus erithacus timneh). The Congo African grey is slightly larger than the Timneh, and has bright red tail feathers. The Timneh's

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  • Bearded Dragons

    Bearded dragons are generally docile, and their aggressive displays are rarely seen in captivity. It is reported that even wild bearded dragons will sometimes allow themselves to be picked up without a struggle. Popular as pets, bearded dragons or "beardies" are moderately sized lizards native to Australia.

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  • Captive Reptiles May Have Nutritional Deficiency

    Pet owners keeping reptiles in captivity as household pets may sometimes find that their pets have a nutritional deficiency. Metabolic bone disease is "the most common nutritional deficiency affecting captive reptiles," advises veterinarian Fredrick L. Frye in Reptile Care: An Atlas of Diseases and Treatments.

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